Through Our Eyes-02/14/17

Sumner Franklin (on left), from the University of Kentucky, takes a punch to the face from Miguel Brarzey, from WKU, at the Sigma Chi Fraternity Fight Night in the Sloan Convention Center on Friday, Feb 10, 2017. Franklin won the match.|Silas Walker

London Alford, 4, and older sister Quinlann Alford, 6, from Bowling Green react to the Cowgirl Trick Riders performing their stunts. Quinlann enjoys the rodeo for the animals. “When I grow up I want to be a vet,” said Quinlann.| Michelle Hank

Jill Matthews, a Freshman from Louisville, stands with her clarinet in Minton Hall on February 14, 2017. Matthews is a music major and has played the clarinet for 9 years. “I love playing music,” Matthews said. “It teaches me something new about myself every day.”|Morgan Hornsby

Sigma Chi fighter Justin Williams walks into the ring before his bout during Sigma Chi fight nigh on Thursday Feb. 9, 2017 at the Sloan Convention Center.|Shaban Athuman

Kenowa Hills’ Megan Titus reacts with her teammates after it was announced that Kenowa Hills won the Knight Invite at Kenowa Hills High School on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017.|Mike Clark

A rodeo contestant competes in the steer wrestling competition at the Lone Star Rodeo in Bowling Green, Ky. on February 10, 2017|Mhari Shaw

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Living On A Dollar A Day – Gallery Show by Renée C. Byer

The School of Journalism & Broadcasting is excited to announce the opening of a photographic and interactive exhibition that promises to change the way you look at the world.

Living On A Dollar A Day: The lives and faces of the world’s poor.
By Renée C Byer 

An interactive photographic exhibit that inspires people to create change with compassion, education and action.

For detailed information: http://wkupj.com/event/living-on-a-dollar-a-day-gallery-reception/

Thursday, February 16
Opening Reception: 6:00PM MMTH Atrium
Artist Lecture: 7:30PM MMTH Auditorium
(Lecture is a WKU “swipable” event)

MMTH Gallery and Atrium
February 16 – April 28
1666 Normal Drive on the WKU campus

Gallery Hours
Sunday  |  3:00PM – 9:00PM
Monday – Thursday  |  9:00AM – 9:00 PM
Friday  |  9:00AM – 5:00PM

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Poster Print available for Renée C. Byer Gallery Opening and Lecture

In conjunction with tonight’s gallery opening and artist lecture by Renée C. Byer, the WKU student chapter of National Press Photographers Association is selling prints for $10 as a fundraiser.

Following this evening’s talk, Renée Byer will sign the poster print from her project about Living On A Dollar A Day: The lives and faces of the world’s poor.

The 13×19 poster printed on high quality photographic paper will only be available to people who reserve a print before 5 p.m. today Thursday Feb 16.

To reserve a print, email wkunppa@gmail.com with your name and number of prints you would like to purchase and bring your $10 with you to pick up after the event. 

If you have any questions, feel free to email them to wkunppa@gmail.com

Thursday, February 16 – Mass Media and Technology Hall
Opening Reception: 6:00PM MMTH Atrium
Artist Lecture: 7:30PM MMTH Auditorium

See you tonight!
WKU NPPA

 

 

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Love You Forever

Love You Forever

WKUPJ Student Srijita Chattopadhyay documents Melanie Hack’s struggle to carry on following the death of her 12-year-old daughter Reagan, who died from an  overdose of prescription pills. “I am tied of everybody hating me.” were Reagan’s last words to her mother, who learned Reagan had been a victim of bullying.

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Decision to Dance

Decision to Dance

Photographs by Lydia Schweickart

The decisions people make for family is the subject of a photo story by WKU student Lydia Schweickart, who documented the double life of mother and exotic dancer Rachael, a.k.a. Nicole.  After Rachael’s fiancé was laid off from his job she started supporting the family by dancing at Tattle Tale’s Gentleman’s Club, bringing home more in one night what than her fiancé’ brought home in two weeks. Now that he has found another job and Rachel is expecting another child, she has decided to quit, after her doctor banned her from doing extreme activities.

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Through Our Eyes – 02/07/17

Kathy Masulis and Yohannes Armstrong exchange “I love you”s at Nashville’s vigil and rally in response to Trump’s executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries. Kathy is a friend of Johannes’ mom, Patricia Armstrong, who explained that “we stand with our Muslim brothers and sisters.” Johannes was adopted from Ethiopia, and although is immigration status in America is different than those affected by the ban, he is still a refugee.|Lydia Schweickart

Fashion portrait of Rafey Wahlah, February 5, 2017. |Alyse Young

Bat researcher Chris Clark records information about one of the 63 Little Brown Bats (Myotis lucifugus) at Bat Cave during a count to monitor the population. Bat Cave boasted Little Brown populations up to 311 in the early 1990’s and have significantly dropped since the finding of White-Nose Syndrome in Mammoth Cave National Park in 2012, now at a maximum of 20% it’s recorded height. |Justin Gilliland

Community members hold candles at the Bowling Green Massacre Remembrance Gathering Feb. 3, 2016. Organizer Justin Swindle, 27, said it all began as a joke with friends. “It somehow got super popular,” Swindle said,” so we tried to make it matter by collecting donations.” Donations will be given to the International Center of Kentucky. |Abby Potter

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Through Our Eyes – 1/24/17 – Winter Edition

Western Kentucky running back Anthony Wales (20) dives for a touchdown during the C-USA championship game against LA Tech on Saturday Dec. 3, 2016 at L. T. Smith Stadium.

Western Kentucky running back Anthony Wales (20) dives for a touchdown during the C-USA championship game against LA Tech on Saturday Dec. 3, 2016 at L. T. Smith Stadium. |Shaban Athuman

ii Larry Gordy recalls how it feels to raise a family on what he calls a Native American prisoner of war camp. Living on poisoned land has killed his family members and affected his livestock, but he cannot imagine leaving the land of his people.

Larry Gordy recalls how it feels to raise a family on what he calls a Native American prisoner of war camp. Living on poisoned land has killed his family members and affected his livestock, but he cannot imagine leaving the land of his people.|Gabriel Scarlett

Larry Gordy looks for his cattle's tracks on an abandoned uranium mine near his home in Cameron, Arizona that has not been reclaimed or cleaned up. As a child on the impoverished Navajo Nation Reservation, he remembers his excitement when he would camp out at the site, oblivious to the deadly radiation that maxes out most geiger counters.

Larry Gordy looks for his cattle’s tracks on an abandoned uranium mine near his home in Cameron, Arizona that has not been reclaimed or cleaned up. As a child on the impoverished Navajo Nation Reservation, he remembers his excitement when he would camp out at the site, oblivious to the deadly radiation that maxes out most geiger counters.|Gabriel Scarlett

Larry Gordy walks among the testing pits and waste mounds on his grazing lands on the Navajo Nation near Cameron, Arizona. He remembers trail riding with his father, a Navajo uranium miner across this poisoned land before his death.

Larry Gordy walks among the testing pits and waste mounds on his grazing lands on the Navajo Nation near Cameron, Arizona. He remembers trail riding with his father, a Navajo uranium miner across this poisoned land before his death.|Gabriel Scarlett

Monument Valley, land of John Wayne Westerns and home to the Navajo.

Monument Valley, land of John Wayne Westerns and home to the Navajo. |Gabriel Scarlett

David Neztsosie at the gravesite to his two daughters who died of their exposure to uranium that he brought back from his job in the mines. He is now sick and dying, surviving off of medication and bottled oxygen.

David Neztsosie at the gravesite to his two daughters who died of their exposure to uranium that he brought back from his job in the mines. He is now sick and dying, surviving off of medication and bottled oxygen. |Gabriel Scarlett

Will Hudgins raises his voice and his snack during the ANSWER Coalition inaugural protest in Washington D.C. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. Hudgins travelled from Seguin, Texas with his wife Daisy Luviano and their 13-month-old daughter Azelia to protest Donald Trump’s policies on education and immigration. “I fell in love with a Hispanic woman,” he said, “and our child should not have to suffer for that heritage.”

Will Hudgins raises his voice and his snack during the ANSWER Coalition inaugural protest in Washington D.C. Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. Hudgins travelled from Seguin, Texas with his wife Daisy Luviano and their 13-month-old daughter Azelia to protest Donald Trump’s policies on education and immigration. “I fell in love with a Hispanic woman,” he said, “and our child should not have to suffer for that heritage.” |Abby Potter

Terry Perry, an anti-Trump protestor from Pa., dances to a cover of Michael Jackson’s “Man in the Mirror” during the ANSWER Coalition’s protest of Donald Trump’s inauguration.

Terry Perry, an anti-Trump protestor from Pa., dances to a cover of Michael Jackson’s “Man in the Mirror” during the ANSWER Coalition’s protest of Donald Trump’s inauguration. |Abby Potter

A protestor points to the word “Fascist” on his sign while a Trump supporter fakes tears in response from inside a restaurant on Pennsylvania Avenue. Demonstrators shouted and pressed signs against this window while those inside sipped champagne and watched. This continued until a woman got up and closed the blinds.

A protestor points to the word “Fascist” on his sign while a Trump supporter fakes tears in response from inside a restaurant on Pennsylvania Avenue. Demonstrators shouted and pressed signs against this window while those inside sipped champagne and watched. This continued until a woman got up and closed the blinds. |Abby Potter

|Video by Shaban Athuman

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At the end of the American Dream

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At the end of the American Dream

Six years ago,Ayaz Sadal left his family in Pakistan with the hope of creating a better future for himself in the United States.

Now married, Ayaz is kept apart from his wife while awaiting her visa. The change in politics has Ayaz questioning their future in the United States and wondering if his sacrifice for the dream has been worth it.

View the complete story by Alyse Young

 

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Brotherhood

Chris Stafford

Brotherhood

Overcoming the loss of family, Chris Stafford builds a new bond within his Engine Company

After the life-long dream of becoming a professional football player didn’t pan out, he pursued another desired career path – firefighting. Now working as a firefighter for the past two years at the Bowling Green Fire Department, Stafford tries to live up to the example set by his brother Jason Johnson, who died a month before he got hired for the job.

View Shaban Athuman’s story of Stafford’s journey to honor his family while building a trust in a new brotherhood. Complete Story Here

 

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Through Our Eyes – 11/15/16

Freshman Kain Youman, of Frankfort, Kentucky, attempts to tell a friend to call his mother through the glass of a Warren County Sheriff's car window after the anti-Trump protest on campus on November 10, 2016. Youman was charged with failure to disperse.

Freshman Kain Youman, of Frankfort, Kentucky, attempts to tell a friend to call his mother through the glass of a Warren County Sheriff’s car window after the anti-Trump protest on campus on November 10, 2016. Youman was charged with failure to disperse. |Justin Gilliland

JT Graves shows off his puppy Rambo while his sister Alisha watches from close by at their home in Bowling Green, Ky. on Nov. 6, 2016.

JT Graves shows off his puppy Rambo while his sister Alisha watches from close by at their home in Bowling Green, Ky. on Nov. 6, 2016. |Gabriel Scarlett

Margaret Tabor has worked at voting stations in Bowling Green, Ky. for the last 42 years as a voting clerk and a ballot judge. At 80, she thinks it might finally be time to retire. Unabashedly supporting Donald Trump and toting her elephant necklace, she says, "I just don't think Hillary would stand behind this flag if we elected her."

Margaret Tabor has worked at voting stations in Bowling Green, Ky. for the last 42 years as a voting clerk and a ballot judge. At 80, she thinks it might finally be time to retire. Unabashedly supporting Donald Trump and toting her elephant necklace, she says, “I just don’t think Hillary would stand behind this flag if we elected her.” |Gabriel Scarlett

A man is helped by emergency workers after being hit by a car on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, at on Highway 31W in Bowling Green, Ky. Campaigners lined the corners of the intersection where the man was hit. "I didn't see him" said the driver while talking to police. The man that was hit moved onto the street as people were campaigning on a nearby sidewalk.

A man is helped by emergency workers after being hit by a car on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, at on Highway 31W in Bowling Green, Ky. Campaigners lined the corners of the intersection where the man was hit. “I didn’t see him” said the driver while talking to police. The man that was hit moved onto the street as people were campaigning on a nearby sidewalk. |Michael Noble Jr.

Boys scouts and members of the military bring out a flag before the national anthem in an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016, in Bowling Green, Ky.

Boys scouts and members of the military bring out a flag before the national anthem in an NCAA college football game, Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016, in Bowling Green, Ky. |Michael Noble Jr.

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