Through Our Eyes – 9/20/16

Derek Harris, the bass player for The Misty Mountain String Band, fixes his tie backstage before the start of the first Live Lost River Music Session at the Capitol Arts Center on Thursday, September 15th, 2016. This Lost River Music Session hosted a variety of folk-genres for a packed crowd, such as Bluegrass and Americana. || Photo by Weston Kenney

Derek Harris, the bass player for The Misty Mountain String Band, fixes his tie backstage before the start of the first Live Lost River Music Session at the Capitol Arts Center on Thursday, September 15th, 2016. This Lost River Music Session hosted a variety of folk-genres for a packed crowd, such as Bluegrass and Americana. |Weston Kenney

Skeeter Depp carries his new son, Treyson Depp, out of the c-section surgery room. Tryson is a "rainbow baby," a healthy child born after a series of miscarriages. || Photo by Abigail Potter

Skeeter Depp carries his new son, Treyson Depp, out of the c-section surgery room. Tryson is a “rainbow baby,” a healthy child born after a series of miscarriages. |Abigail Potter

William Kirby, 71, recalls difficult memories from the tumultuous 1960s in America. As a teenager in Alabama, he remembers the rape of an African-American girl by a group of white boys. After weeks of recovery, the girl and her friends went out to a movie that he was at with his friends. "They snatch this particular girl from the crowd and they hung her right out in the courthouse yard," Kirby explains, his voice breaking with emotion. "There wasn't about five of us, and all these white people around, we wasn't going to try to save her. We runned for our lives too." Three years later, he volunteered for the U.S. Army to fight for a country that did not yet guarantee him his human rights. During the recruiting process, he witnessed the riots in Montgomery from the third floor of a hotel but was ordered by his commanding officers to not take part, talk about it, or to take sides. "I watched them spray them with a hose, letting them dogs loose on people...It's in the history books, but what I saw made those history books real." || Photo by Gabriel Scarlett

William Kirby, 71, recalls difficult memories from the tumultuous 1960s in America. As a teenager in Alabama, he remembers the rape of an African-American girl by a group of white boys. After weeks of recovery, the girl and her friends went out to a movie that he was at with his friends. “They snatch this particular girl from the crowd and they hung her right out in the courthouse yard,” Kirby explains, his voice breaking with emotion. “There wasn’t about five of us, and all these white people around, we wasn’t going to try to save her. We runned for our lives too.” Three years later, he volunteered for the U.S. Army to fight for a country that did not yet guarantee him his human rights. During the recruiting process, he witnessed the riots in Montgomery from the third floor of a hotel but was ordered by his commanding officers to not take part, talk about it, or to take sides. “I watched them spray them with a hose, letting them dogs loose on people…It’s in the history books, but what I saw made those history books real.” | Gabriel Scarlett

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